Posts Tagged ‘writing’

Sex 2.0 conference in Atlanta 4/12

April 10, 2008

I’ll be teaching Erotica 101 at 9:30 a.m. this Saturday in Atlanta for Sex 2.0, a one-day “unconference” where you can learn everything from “Sex blogging as a feminist project” with Elizabeth Wood of to “HOWTO: Gt the most out of sex/tech” with Regina Lynn to “Sex Styles of the Internet Famous” by Melissa Gira, description below, to my friend/roommate Twanna A. Hines‘s “A Brief History of Sex.” Also, not about sex, but on Sunday at 3 p.m. I’ll be playing cupcake bingo at Sweet Pockets – stop by if you like!

On the Internet, we’re all famous to fifteen people. Inevitably, you’ll date at least one of them. So how does one gracefully navigate Relationships 2-point-whatever? Is post-coital Twittering acceptable? Should you block an ex from your Flickr? Do we need to call in a couples’ counselor to revise our Facebook relationship status together? After the breakup, who gets custody of the secret sex vlog? A seriously self-effacing facilitated discussion of social networking & managing your identity online when that comes close to and at odds with that of your lovers & partners.

Read more about it with Amber Rhea’s interview with Cory Silverberg at About.com

Press for Best Sex Writing 2008

January 28, 2008

Last week, after our group reading, we did a joint podcast interview, all five of us, for Bat Segundo. I’m only sorry I don’t have a photo of us all sitting around with huge microphones at a pizza place! That is probably the most interesting location I’ve ever done an interview in! Click below to listen to me, Rachel Shukert, Liz Langley, Lux Nightmare and Miriam Datskovsky.

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Manleez.com also did video interviews with us which will be up soon; for now, read Jordan Manley’s take on the book.

And more reviews are coming soon, along with some cool interviews with contributors.

My friend Jason Boog over at The Publishing Spot</a> interviewed me for his “Five Easy Questions” segment. I think my answers were so long he’s running them in more than one part. And I love the title he gave the piece: “How To Write About Sex Without Sounding Like A Spam Email

Here’s a snippet:

Jason Boog:

It takes a lot to write frankly and vividly about sex. There are so many clichés and taboos to steer around. What’s your advice for a writer looking to write more physical, sensual, and sexy nonfiction? How can we avoid clichés and stop gettting hung up on taboos?

Rachel Kramer Bussel:
I think the first thing to do is to forget about anything you think you “should” do. We all talk and think about sex differently, so the words that may feel right to me might not be right to you. I think sometimes people make the mistake that simply writing about sex is automatically titillating, when that’s not the case at all. You can write smart nonfiction about sex that’s insightful without being clinical – and you can also write erotica that’s actually not sexy at all.

Being honest, with yourself and your audience, is foremost. If that means using a pseudonym, use a pseudonym, but you don’t want to be cagey. I don’t mean you have to be clinical, I just mean don’t make assumptions about what your readers are into sexually.